View a PDF of the 4-week undergraduate courses

Δ This symbol means that the course is offered online.

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+African American Studies (AAST)

AAST 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as LALS 225 and SOC 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

+Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 101 – World Cultures: Introduction to Social Anthropology 
3 hours. Concepts and methods in the study of world cultures from a comparative anthropological perspective, emphasizing selected non-U.S. societies, cultures, and ethnographic regions. Individual and Society, and World Cultures course.

ANTH 272 – North American Indians
3 hours. Survey of the indigenous culture of North America as viewed through the generations by early explorers, missionaries, nineteenth century ethnologists, and contemporary social scientists.

+Art History (AH)

AH 276 – Native American Art: From the Vanishing Noble Savage to an Aboriginal Cinema: A History of Representations of Native Americans on Film
3 hours. Selected topics in the art, architecture, and visual culture of the native peoples of North, Central and South America and the Caribbean. May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): 3 hours of Art History at the 100-level or consent of the instructor. Recommended background: AH 273 or AH 274.

+Asian Studies (ASST)

ASST 276 – Modern South Asia, 1857 to the Present
3 hours. Examines anti-colonial resistance to British rule starting with the 1857 Revolt, Indian nationalism, and the formation of independent nation-states in South Asia. Same as HIST 276. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion. Past course, and World Cultures course.

+Biological Sciences (BIOS)

BIOS 240 – Homeostasis: The Physiology of Plants and Animals
3 hours. Basic concepts of physiological mechanisms that contribute to survival of multicellular organisms. Comparison of a variety of organisms. Prerequisites: BIOS 100 and BIOS 101. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 331 – General Ecology Laboratory
3 hours. Field and laboratory data collection for hypothesis testing; required field trips to representative plant communities. Animals used in instruction. Required field trips on Saturdays. Prerequisite: BIOS 101. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

 

+Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 101 – Preparatory Chemistry
4 hours. Emphasis on problem solving. Metric units, dimensional analysis, chemical nomenclature, the mole concept, chemical stoichiometry. For students without entrance credit in high school chemistry or inadequately prepared. Prerequisite: Adequate performance on the UIC chemistry placement examination.

+Communication (COMM)

COMM 100 – Fundamentals of Human Communication
3 hours. Emphasis on strategies for public speaking and conducting meetings. Effective approaches to audience analysis, speaker credibility, using evidence, argument development, speech delivery, and planning meetings. No credit given toward the Major in Communication. Individual and Society course.

COMM 101 – Introduction to Communication
3 hours. Introduction to central concepts in communication, including key terms and theories, specific contexts and key debates. Individual and Society course.

COMM 102 – Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
3 hours. Effective communication in human relationships; verbal and nonverbal messages; reflective listening, disclosure, showing affection, empathy, assertiveness; handling interpersonal conflict; cultural and gender differences. Individual and Society course.

+Criminology, Law, and Justice (CLJ)

CLJ 101 – Introduction to Criminology, Law, and Justice
3 hours. The study of the development and contemporary operations of criminal justice agencies, from police through probation and parole, focusing upon “power elites” and the use of discretion. US Society course.

+Curriculum and Instruction (CI)

CI 484 – Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle School
3 hours. Philosophy, curriculum, and instructional methods for teaching middle grade students (grades five through eight). Content area reading is included. Prerequisites: EPSY 255 or both ED 200 and ED 210; or graduate standing and either ED 402 or ED 403, and ED 421; and approval of the College of Education.

CI 528 – Assessing Literacy in Classrooms
4 hours. Introduction to and practicum in K-12 classroom literacy assessment and its relation to literacy instruction. Addresses purposes of and techniques for conducting/interpreting specific literacy assessments. Extensive computer use required [word processing on writing; search engines for examining literacy curriculum, professional organizations, email networks, use of power point, excel and SPSS]. Prerequisites: CI 450 and CI 503 and CI 504 and consent of the instructor. Open only to Master’s degree students. Recommended background: Admission to M.Ed. in Instructional Leadership: Literacy, Language and Culture.

CI 529 – Secondary Science Education in Urban Settings
4 hours. Introduction to the study of curriculum and teaching for those interested in urban education and who want to become secondary science teachers at the middle and high school levels. 4 hours. Field work required. Recommended background: An undergraduate degree in a science field. Class Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

+Economics (ECON)

ECON 221 – Macroeconomics in the World Economy: Theory and Applications
3 hours. Determinants of the level of economic activity, inflation, unemployment, international economics, impact of domestic and world economy on business decisions, applications of the theory. Same as INST 221. Prerequisites: ECON 130, or both ECON 120 and ECON 121; and MATH 160.

ECON 333 – International Economics
3 hours. The balance of payments; fixed, flexible and multiple exchange rates; capital flows; comparative advantage; tariffs and subsidies; the factor price equalization theorem. Same as INST 333. Prerequisite: ECON 218 or ECON 220 or ECON 221 or INST 221.

+Education (ED)

ED 431 – Improving Learning Environments
3 hours. Analysis of structural, normative, and social dimensions of learning environments and their relationships to student learning. Exploration of change processes to improve those environments. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

+Educational Psychology (EPSY)

EPSY 465 – Cognitive Development and Disabilities
3 hours. Theory and research on cognitive development in children with disabilities from infancy through adolescence, in the context of typical development. Models for cognitive assessment and intervention. Same as SPED 465. Field work required. Prerequisite: SPED 461 or ED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

+English (ENGL)

ENGL 102 – Introduction to Film
3 hours. Representative selections from a variety of periods and forms. Development of analytical skills in the reading of film. Same as MOVI 102. Creative Arts course.

ENGL 161 – Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3 hours. Students learn about academic inquiry and complete several writing projects including a documented research paper. Topics vary by section. Prerequisite: ENGL 160 or the equivalent. All students take the Writing Placement Test. If students place into ESL 050, ESL 060, ENGL 150, ENGL 152 or ENGL 160, the student must take that course (or courses) prior to enrolling in ENGL 161. Students with an ACT English subscore of 27 or higher receive a waiver of ENGL 160 and permission to enroll in ENGL 161. Important placement testing and prerequisite information for visiting students.

ENGL 241 – English Literature I: Beginnings to 1660
3 hours. A survey of significant works of English literature, beginnings to 1660, their historical, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions, from a number of critical perspectives. Prerequisites: Completion of the University Writing requirement or concurrent registration in ENGL 161 or ENGL 171. Recommended background: 3 hours of English from ENGL 101-123.

+Finance (FIN)

FIN 301 – Introduction to Managerial Finance
3 hours. Introduces students to managerial finance: the valuation of future cash flows, capital budgeting, capital structure, and banking. Current events and policy issues are discussed.

FIN 473 – Introduction to Risk Management
3 hours. Introduction to risk management. Loan and credit management; credit scoring. Risk measurements and reserves; banking and insurance capital requirements, the BASEL accord, tail events and catastrophic event insurance. Financial contracts and hedging. Same as IDS 473. Prerequisites: FIN 300 and IDS 371.

+Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS)

GWS 101 – Gender in Everyday Life
3 hours. An interdisciplinary introduction to GWS that draws on the humanities and social sciences. Emphasizes intersections of gender, race, sexuality, class, and nation. Addresses historical and contemporary debates, focusing primarily on U.S. concerns. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

+History (HIST)

HIST 104  Modern America: From Industrialization to Globalization
3 hours. Introduction to the political, cultural, and social developments in American society since the end of the Civil War. Past, and US Society course.

HIST 276 – Modern South Asia, 1857 to the Present
3 hours. Examines anti-colonial resistance to British rule starting with the 1857 Revolt, Indian nationalism, and the formation of independent nation-states in South Asia. Same as ASST 276. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion. Past course, and World Cultures course.

HIST 281 – Topics in Social History: Film and American History
3 hours. Specific topics are announced each term. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.

+Industrial Engineering (IE)

IE 201 – Financial Engineering
3 hours. Principles and techniques of economic analysis in engineering; Financial decision making; Single and multi project selection techniques. Prerequisite(s): MATH 181.

+Information and Decision Sciences (IDS)

IDS 312 – Business Project Management
3 hours. An integrative approach to learning how projects contribute to the strategic goals of the organization. Major issues: selecting projects, project management techniques and tools, budgeting, monitoring, risk mitigation, and interpersonal skills.

IDS 473 – Introduction to Risk Management
3 hours. Introduction to risk management. Loan and credit management; credit scoring. Risk measurements and reserves; banking and insurance capital requirements, the BASEL accord, tail events and catastrophic event insurance. Financial contracts and hedging. Same as FIN 473. Prerequisites: FIN 300 and IDS 371.

+International Studies (INST)

INST 221 – Macroeconomics in the World Economy: Theory and Applications
3 hours. Determinants of the level of economic activity, inflation, unemployment, international economics, impact of domestic and world economy on business decisions, applications of the theory. Same as ECON 221. Prerequisites: ECON 130, or both ECON 120 and ECON 121; and MATH 160.

INST 333 – International Economics
3 hours. The balance of payments; fixed, flexible and multiple exchange rates; capital flows; comparative advantage; tariffs and subsidies; the factor price equalization theorem. Same as ECON 333. Prerequisite: ECON 218 or ECON 220 or ECON 221 or INST 221.

+Kinesiology (KN)

KN 335 – Exercise Psychology
3 hours. Presents the psychological basis for exercise motivation, behavior and outcomes. Focus on application of theoretical models of exercise adherence and psychological strategies to improve participation in regular exercise. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100.   Δ Online

+Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS)

LALS 101 – Introduction to Latin American Studies
3 hours. Introduction to the major concepts, issues, and debates in the field of Latin American Studies. Overview of history, cultures, and issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class in Latin America. Past, and World Cultures course.

LALS 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as AAST 225 and SOC 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

+Management (MGMT)

MGMT 340 – Introduction to Organizations
3 hours. Important organization and management concepts and applications. Their relevance to individual and organizational goal attainment. Emphasizes organizational structure, systems, processes, and change, national and global. Prerequisite: ENGL 161.

MGMT 463 – Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
3 hours. Strategies and techniques for successful agreement negotiation and business conflict resolution. Includes applications to classic situations such as collective bargaining, interpersonal relations, and stakeholder concerns. Prerequisite: MGMT 340.

+Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 125 – Elementary Linear Algebra
5 hours. Introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices and vector spaces, with emphasis on business applications. Prerequisite(s): Math 090 or grade of C or better in Math 121 or appropriate performance on the UIC mathematics placement test.

MATH 180 – Calculus I
5 hours. Differentiation, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, related rates, mean-value theorem, antiderivative, Riemann integral, logarithm, and exponential functions. Credit is not given for MATH 180 if the student has credit for MATH 165 or MATH 170. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 121 or appropriate performance on the department placement test. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World – No Lab courseImportant prerequisite information for visiting students

MATH 220 – Introduction to Differential Equations 
3 hours. Techniques and applications of differential equations. First order equations: separable and linear. Linear second order equations, Laplace transforms, and series solutions. Graphical and numerical methods. Fourier series and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 310 – Applied Linear Algebra
3 hours. Matrices, Gaussian elimination, vector spaces, LU-decomposition, orthogonality, Gram-Schmidt process, determinants, inner products, eigenvalue problems, applications to differential equations and Markov processes. Credit is not given for MATH 310 if the student has credit for MATH 320. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

+Moving Image Arts (MOVI)

MOVI 102 – Introduction to Film
3 hours. Representative selections from a variety of periods and forms. Development of analytical skills in the reading of film. Same as ENGL 102. Creative Arts course.

MOVI 200 – Communication Technologies
3 hours. History, development, and social impact of communication technology: print, broadcast, cable, satellite, computer, internet. Issues related to infrastructure, regulation, access, globalization, conveyance, and change. Same as COMM 200. This is blended-online and classroom course. Use of computer and internet access is required. A high speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: COMM 103 and sophomore standing or above and approval of the department. Course Information: Registration restrictions: For Moving Image Arts minors must obtain approval of the Department of Communication.

+Music (MUS)

MUS 100 – Introduction to Music I
3 hours. Listening, understanding, and enjoying music. May not be taken for credit by music majors or minors. Creative Arts course.

MUS 107 – Fundamentals of Music Theory
3 hours. Notation, metrical organization and rhythmic structure, scales and key signatures, intervals, triads, ear training, and sight singing. For the general student. May not be taken for credit by music majors or minors. Creative Arts course. Creative Arts course.

+Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 102 – Introductory Logic
3 hours. Sentential logic: representation of English using truth-functional connectives, decision methods, natural deduction techniques. Introduction to predicate logic: representation of English using quantifiers. Natural World – No Lab course.

+Political Science (POLS)

POLS 101 – Introduction to American Government and Politics
3 hours. Introduction to American political ideas, individual and group political behavior, institutions of national government, and public policy. May be taught in blended learning format. Please check the online schedule of classes for blended sections. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture-Discussion. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

POLS 353 – Constitutional Law
3 hours. Selected constitutional provisions and principles as they developed through Supreme Court interpretation. Major attention given to powers and practices of, and interactions among governmental institutions. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or consent of the instructor.

+Psychology (PSCH)

PSCH 231 – Community Psychology
3 hours. Psychological principles, research and interventions concerning community settings; community human services, primary prevention, consultation, advocacy, social ecology, organizational change, and citizen participation. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100. Individual and Society course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 262 – Behavioral Neuroscience
3 hours. Research and theories concerning the physiological bases of behavior. Understanding of basic brain organization with emphasis on neural substrates of learning, motivation and perception. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 324 – Cultural Psychology
3 hours. A survey of theory, methods, and research in culture and psychology. Examination of how culture is defined and studied and how it affects development, socialization, personality, interpersonal relations, and mental health. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100 and Grade of C or better in PSCH 242.

PSCH 352 – Cognition and Memory
3 hours. Survey of experimental findings in human learning, memory, attention, knowledge representation, problem solving, conceptual behavior, and psycholinguistics. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in PSCH 242. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

+Sociology (SOC)

SOC 100 – Introduction to Sociology
3 hours. Analysis of human societies, organizations and groups, and the interrelations among individuals, groups, and societies. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture-Discussion. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

SOC 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as AAST 225 and LALS 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

SOC 426 – Topics in Race, Ethnicity, and Gender
3 OR 4 hours. Intensive examination of a specialized topic in race, ethnicity and gender. The specific topic of the course varies depending on the faculty offering it. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated up to 2 times. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): SOC 224; or SOC 225; and junior standing or above and an additional 200 or 300-level elective in sociology; or consent of the instructor.

+Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 103 – Elementary Spanish III
4 hours. Continuation of SPAN 102 and SPAN 110. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: SPAN 102 or SPAN 110 and placement by the department. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

SPAN 104 – Topics in Spanish Language and Culture
4 hours. Can be used to complete the fourth semester requirement in Spanish. Students work with short literary and cultural readings in Spanish and review some specific grammatical concepts. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access are required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: SPAN 103 and appropriate score on the department placement test or placement by department. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

+Special Education (SPED)

SPED 410 – Survey of Characteristics of Learners with Disabilities
3 hours. Fulfills requirements for Illinois House Bill 150. Field experience required. Learning and personality characteristics of exceptional learners. Diagnostic processes and educational approaches are examined. Prerequisite: ED 210 or ED 421 or graduate standing and consent of the instructor.  Δ online

SPED 465 – Cognitive Development and Disabilities
3 hours. Theory and research on cognitive development in children with disabilities from infancy through adolescence, in the context of typical development. Models for cognitive assessment and intervention. Same as EPSY 465. Field work required. Prerequisite: SPED 461 or ED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

SPED 509 – Educational Implications of Learners with Low-Incidence and Multiple Disabilities
3 hours. Development of knowledge and skills to research, synthesize and apply psychological, sociological, and educational issues for students with multiple and low incidence disabilities. Previously listed as SPED 513. In partial fulfillment of LBSII programs for Behavior Intervention Specialist and Multiple Disabilities Specialist. Prerequisite(s): Must have an LBSI Certificate and Admission to the LBSII Program or admission as a doctorate student or consent of the instructor.

+Statistics (STAT)

STAT 101 – Introduction to Statistics
4 hours. Applications of statistics in the real world, displaying and describing data, normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Credit is not given for STAT 101 for majors in Mathematics and Computer Science, Mathematics, and Teaching of Mathematics. Credit is not given for STAT 101 if the student has credit for STAT 130. Extensive computer use required. This course is offered in both a blended and traditional format. If the section is marked “Blended-Online and Classroom,” use of a computer and internet access is required. Blended sections require students to do some of their coursework online. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggestedPrerequisite: Satisfactory grade in MATH 090, or appropriate score on the Department placement test, or consent of the instructor. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

+Urban Planning And Policy (UPP)

UPP 493 – Topics in Urban Planning and Policy: Bike Planning
1-4 hours. Intensive analysis of selected planning problems or policy issues. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

UPP 493 – Topics in Urban Planning and Policy: Analysis with Excel
1-4 hours. Intensive analysis of selected planning problems or policy issues. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

UPP 493 – Topics in Urban Planning and Policy: Grant Writing
1-4 hours. Intensive analysis of selected planning problems or policy issues. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.