2016 Summer Course List

Take a quick look at the courses offered by clicking on the 4-week or the 8-week button below. (Please note: This list is subject to change and primarily features undergraduate courses; it may not include all courses at graduate level or those in certain programs.)

Check the detailed Course Schedule for meeting days/times or view our list of online summer courses

2016 Session Dates:
4-Week Session:  May 16 – June 10
8-Week Session:  June 13 – August 5

Select the session that you’re interested in from the following lists:

View a PDF of the 4-week undergraduate courses

Δ This symbol means that the course is offered online.

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+African American Studies (AAST)

AAST 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as LALS 225 and SOC 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

+Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 101 – World Cultures: Introduction to Social Anthropology 
3 hours. Concepts and methods in the study of world cultures from a comparative anthropological perspective, emphasizing selected non-U.S. societies, cultures, and ethnographic regions. Individual and Society, and World Cultures course.

ANTH 272 – North American Indians
3 hours. Survey of the indigenous culture of North America as viewed through the generations by early explorers, missionaries, nineteenth century ethnologists, and contemporary social scientists.

+Art History (AH)

AH 276 – Native American Art: From the Vanishing Noble Savage to an Aboriginal Cinema: A History of Representations of Native Americans on Film
3 hours. “In this course we will explore a history of the changing representations of Native Americans in North American film. Key moments in our investigation include the studio recordings of Indigenous performers at the end of the 19th century, the golden age of Westerns in the post-war era, the documentation of the events surrounding the actions of the American Indian Movement in the 1960s and 70s, and the development since the 1990s of a growing body of films made by and starring Indigenous filmmakers and actors. We will screen a wide range of films, including commercial studio productions, independent films, documentaries, and shorts. Engaging both collaboratively and individually in a critical analysis of these films, as well as a selection of relevant academic literature and contemporary film reviews and articles, students will consider strategies of representation, documentation, intervention, and narrativity as employed within various historical, political, and cultural contexts.” Prerequisite(s): 3 hours of Art History at the 100-level or consent of the instructor. Recommended background: AH 273 or AH 274.

+Asian Studies (ASST)

ASST 276 – Modern South Asia, 1857 to the Present
3 hours. Examines anti-colonial resistance to British rule starting with the 1857 Revolt, Indian nationalism, and the formation of independent nation-states in South Asia. Same as HIST 276. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion. Past course, and World Cultures course.

+Biological Sciences (BIOS)

BIOS 240 – Homeostasis: The Physiology of Plants and Animals
3 hours. Basic concepts of physiological mechanisms that contribute to survival of multicellular organisms. Comparison of a variety of organisms. Prerequisites: BIOS 100 and BIOS 101. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 331 – General Ecology Laboratory
3 hours. Field and laboratory data collection for hypothesis testing; required field trips to representative plant communities. Animals used in instruction. Required field trips on Saturdays. Prerequisite: BIOS 101. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

 

+Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 101 – Preparatory Chemistry
4 hours. Emphasis on problem solving. Metric units, dimensional analysis, chemical nomenclature, the mole concept, chemical stoichiometry. For students without entrance credit in high school chemistry or inadequately prepared. Prerequisite: Adequate performance on the UIC chemistry placement examination.

+Communication (COMM)

COMM 100 – Fundamentals of Human Communication
3 hours. Emphasis on strategies for public speaking and conducting meetings. Effective approaches to audience analysis, speaker credibility, using evidence, argument development, speech delivery, and planning meetings. No credit given toward the Major in Communication. Individual and Society course.

COMM 101 – Introduction to Communication
3 hours. Introduction to central concepts in communication, including key terms and theories, specific contexts and key debates. Individual and Society course.

COMM 102 – Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
3 hours. Effective communication in human relationships; verbal and nonverbal messages; reflective listening, disclosure, showing affection, empathy, assertiveness; handling interpersonal conflict; cultural and gender differences. Individual and Society course.

+Criminology, Law, and Justice (CLJ)

CLJ 101 – Introduction to Criminology, Law, and Justice
3 hours. The study of the development and contemporary operations of criminal justice agencies, from police through probation and parole, focusing upon “power elites” and the use of discretion. US Society course.

+Curriculum and Instruction (CI)

CI 484 – Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle School
3 hours. Philosophy, curriculum, and instructional methods for teaching middle grade students (grades five through eight). Content area reading is included. Prerequisites: EPSY 255 or both ED 200 and ED 210; or graduate standing and either ED 402 or ED 403, and ED 421; and approval of the College of Education.

CI 528 – Assessing Literacy in Classrooms
4 hours. Introduction to and practicum in K-12 classroom literacy assessment and its relation to literacy instruction. Addresses purposes of and techniques for conducting/interpreting specific literacy assessments. Extensive computer use required [word processing on writing; search engines for examining literacy curriculum, professional organizations, email networks, use of power point, excel and SPSS]. Prerequisites: CI 450 and CI 503 and CI 504 and consent of the instructor. Open only to Master’s degree students. Recommended background: Admission to M.Ed. in Instructional Leadership: Literacy, Language and Culture.

CI 529 – Secondary Science Education in Urban Settings
4 hours. Introduction to the study of curriculum and teaching for those interested in urban education and who want to become secondary science teachers at the middle and high school levels. 4 hours. Field work required. Recommended background: An undergraduate degree in a science field. Class Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

+Economics (ECON)

ECON 221 – Macroeconomics in the World Economy: Theory and Applications
3 hours. Determinants of the level of economic activity, inflation, unemployment, international economics, impact of domestic and world economy on business decisions, applications of the theory. Same as INST 221. Prerequisites: ECON 130, or both ECON 120 and ECON 121; and MATH 160.

ECON 333 – International Economics
3 hours. The balance of payments; fixed, flexible and multiple exchange rates; capital flows; comparative advantage; tariffs and subsidies; the factor price equalization theorem. Same as INST 333. Prerequisite: ECON 218 or ECON 220 or ECON 221 or INST 221.

+Education (ED)

ED 431 – Improving Learning Environments
3 hours. Analysis of structural, normative, and social dimensions of learning environments and their relationships to student learning. Exploration of change processes to improve those environments. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

+Educational Psychology (EPSY)

EPSY 465 – Cognitive Development and Disabilities
3 hours. Theory and research on cognitive development in children with disabilities from infancy through adolescence, in the context of typical development. Models for cognitive assessment and intervention. Same as SPED 465. Field work required. Prerequisite: SPED 461 or ED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

+English (ENGL)

ENGL 102 – Introduction to Film
3 hours. Representative selections from a variety of periods and forms. Development of analytical skills in the reading of film. Same as MOVI 102. Creative Arts course.

ENGL 161 – Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3 hours. Students learn about academic inquiry and complete several writing projects including a documented research paper. Topics vary by section. Prerequisite: ENGL 160 or the equivalent. All students take the Writing Placement Test. If students place into ESL 050, ESL 060, ENGL 150, ENGL 152 or ENGL 160, the student must take that course (or courses) prior to enrolling in ENGL 161. Students with an ACT English subscore of 27 or higher receive a waiver of ENGL 160 and permission to enroll in ENGL 161. Important placement testing and prerequisite information for visiting students.

ENGL 241 – English Literature I: Beginnings to 1660
3 hours. A survey of significant works of English literature, beginnings to 1660, their historical, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions, from a number of critical perspectives. Prerequisites: Completion of the University Writing requirement or concurrent registration in ENGL 161 or ENGL 171. Recommended background: 3 hours of English from ENGL 101-123.

+Finance (FIN)

FIN 301 – Introduction to Managerial Finance
3 hours. Introduces students to managerial finance: the valuation of future cash flows, capital budgeting, capital structure, and banking. Current events and policy issues are discussed.

FIN 473 – Introduction to Risk Management
3 hours. Introduction to risk management. Loan and credit management; credit scoring. Risk measurements and reserves; banking and insurance capital requirements, the BASEL accord, tail events and catastrophic event insurance. Financial contracts and hedging. Same as IDS 473. Prerequisites: FIN 300 and IDS 371.

+Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS)

GWS 101 – Gender in Everyday Life
3 hours. “This course offers an introduction to Women’s and Gender studies, an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the meanings of sex and gender on society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key topics, questions and debates in Women’s and Gender Studies while utilizing an intersectional framework that acknowledges the wide variety of lived experiences. Focusing on women’s activism, we will explore how gender is a key component in understanding our social world.” Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

+History (HIST)

HIST 104  Modern America: From Industrialization to Globalization
3 hours. Introduction to the political, cultural, and social developments in American society since the end of the Civil War. Past, and US Society course.

HIST 276 – Modern South Asia, 1857 to the Present
3 hours. Examines anti-colonial resistance to British rule starting with the 1857 Revolt, Indian nationalism, and the formation of independent nation-states in South Asia. Same as ASST 276. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 161; or consent of the instructor. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Discussion. Past course, and World Cultures course.

HIST 281 – Topics in Social History: Film and American History
3 hours. Specific topics are announced each term. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.

+Industrial Engineering (IE)

IE 201 – Financial Engineering
3 hours. Principles and techniques of economic analysis in engineering; Financial decision making; Single and multi project selection techniques. Prerequisite(s): MATH 181.

+Information and Decision Sciences (IDS)

IDS 312 – Business Project Management
3 hours. An integrative approach to learning how projects contribute to the strategic goals of the organization. Major issues: selecting projects, project management techniques and tools, budgeting, monitoring, risk mitigation, and interpersonal skills.

IDS 473 – Introduction to Risk Management
3 hours. Introduction to risk management. Loan and credit management; credit scoring. Risk measurements and reserves; banking and insurance capital requirements, the BASEL accord, tail events and catastrophic event insurance. Financial contracts and hedging. Same as FIN 473. Prerequisites: FIN 300 and IDS 371.

+International Studies (INST)

INST 221 – Macroeconomics in the World Economy: Theory and Applications
3 hours. Determinants of the level of economic activity, inflation, unemployment, international economics, impact of domestic and world economy on business decisions, applications of the theory. Same as ECON 221. Prerequisites: ECON 130, or both ECON 120 and ECON 121; and MATH 160.

INST 333 – International Economics
3 hours. The balance of payments; fixed, flexible and multiple exchange rates; capital flows; comparative advantage; tariffs and subsidies; the factor price equalization theorem. Same as ECON 333. Prerequisite: ECON 218 or ECON 220 or ECON 221 or INST 221.

+Kinesiology (KN)

KN 335 – Exercise Psychology
3 hours. Presents the psychological basis for exercise motivation, behavior and outcomes. Focus on application of theoretical models of exercise adherence and psychological strategies to improve participation in regular exercise. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100.   Δ Online

+Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS)

LALS 101 – Introduction to Latin American Studies
3 hours. Introduction to the major concepts, issues, and debates in the field of Latin American Studies. Overview of history, cultures, and issues of race, ethnicity, gender, class in Latin America. Past, and World Cultures course.

LALS 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as AAST 225 and SOC 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

+Management (MGMT)

MGMT 340 – Introduction to Organizations
3 hours. Important organization and management concepts and applications. Their relevance to individual and organizational goal attainment. Emphasizes organizational structure, systems, processes, and change, national and global. Prerequisite: ENGL 161.

MGMT 463 – Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
3 hours. Strategies and techniques for successful agreement negotiation and business conflict resolution. Includes applications to classic situations such as collective bargaining, interpersonal relations, and stakeholder concerns. Prerequisite: MGMT 340.

+Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 125 – Elementary Linear Algebra
5 hours. Introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices and vector spaces, with emphasis on business applications. Prerequisite(s): Math 090 or grade of C or better in Math 121 or appropriate performance on the UIC mathematics placement test.

MATH 180 – Calculus I
5 hours. Differentiation, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, related rates, mean-value theorem, antiderivative, Riemann integral, logarithm, and exponential functions. Credit is not given for MATH 180 if the student has credit for MATH 165 or MATH 170. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in MATH 121 or appropriate performance on the department placement test. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture. Natural World – No Lab course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students

MATH 220 – Introduction to Differential Equations 
3 hours. Techniques and applications of differential equations. First order equations: separable and linear. Linear second order equations, Laplace transforms, and series solutions. Graphical and numerical methods. Fourier series and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 310 – Applied Linear Algebra
3 hours. Matrices, Gaussian elimination, vector spaces, LU-decomposition, orthogonality, Gram-Schmidt process, determinants, inner products, eigenvalue problems, applications to differential equations and Markov processes. Credit is not given for MATH 310 if the student has credit for MATH 320. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

+Moving Image Arts (MOVI)

MOVI 102 – Introduction to Film
3 hours. Representative selections from a variety of periods and forms. Development of analytical skills in the reading of film. Same as ENGL 102. Creative Arts course.

MOVI 200 – Communication Technologies
3 hours. History, development, and social impact of communication technology: print, broadcast, cable, satellite, computer, internet. Issues related to infrastructure, regulation, access, globalization, conveyance, and change. Same as COMM 200. This is blended-online and classroom course. Use of computer and internet access is required. A high speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: COMM 103 and sophomore standing or above and approval of the department. Course Information: Registration restrictions: For Moving Image Arts minors must obtain approval of the Department of Communication.

+Music (MUS)

MUS 100 – Introduction to Music I
3 hours. Listening, understanding, and enjoying music. May not be taken for credit by music majors or minors. Creative Arts course.

MUS 107 – Fundamentals of Music Theory
3 hours. Notation, metrical organization and rhythmic structure, scales and key signatures, intervals, triads, ear training, and sight singing. For the general student. May not be taken for credit by music majors or minors. Creative Arts course. Creative Arts course.

+Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 102 – Introductory Logic
3 hours. “What makes Sherlock Holmes a good detective? He uses deductive reasoning to reach his conclusions to solve cases, meaning he arrives at his conclusions with logical certainty. In this course we will explore fundamental concepts of deductive reasoning in symbolic logic. Students will develop powerful skills to reason well and think abstractly. This course fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.” Sentential logic: representation of English using truth-functional connectives, decision methods, natural deduction techniques. Introduction to predicate logic: representation of English using quantifiers. Natural World – No Lab course.

+Political Science (POLS)

POLS 101 – Introduction to American Government and Politics
3 hours. Introduction to American political ideas, individual and group political behavior, institutions of national government, and public policy. May be taught in blended learning format. Please check the online schedule of classes for blended sections. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture-Discussion. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

POLS 353 – Constitutional Law
3 hours. Selected constitutional provisions and principles as they developed through Supreme Court interpretation. Major attention given to powers and practices of, and interactions among governmental institutions. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or consent of the instructor.

+Psychology (PSCH)

PSCH 231 – Community Psychology
3 hours. Psychological principles, research and interventions concerning community settings; community human services, primary prevention, consultation, advocacy, social ecology, organizational change, and citizen participation. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100. Individual and Society course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 262 – Behavioral Neuroscience
3 hours. Research and theories concerning the physiological bases of behavior. Understanding of basic brain organization with emphasis on neural substrates of learning, motivation and perception. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 324 – Cultural Psychology
3 hours. A survey of theory, methods, and research in culture and psychology. Examination of how culture is defined and studied and how it affects development, socialization, personality, interpersonal relations, and mental health. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100 and Grade of C or better in PSCH 242.

PSCH 352 – Cognition and Memory
3 hours. Survey of experimental findings in human learning, memory, attention, knowledge representation, problem solving, conceptual behavior, and psycholinguistics. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in PSCH 242. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

+Sociology (SOC)

SOC 100 – Introduction to Sociology
3 hours. Analysis of human societies, organizations and groups, and the interrelations among individuals, groups, and societies. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture-Discussion. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

SOC 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as AAST 225 and LALS 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

SOC 426 – Topics in Race, Ethnicity, and Gender
3 OR 4 hours. Intensive examination of a specialized topic in race, ethnicity and gender. The specific topic of the course varies depending on the faculty offering it. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated up to 2 times. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): SOC 224; or SOC 225; and junior standing or above and an additional 200 or 300-level elective in sociology; or consent of the instructor.

+Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 103 – Elementary Spanish III
4 hours. Continuation of SPAN 102 and SPAN 110. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: SPAN 102 or SPAN 110 and placement by the department. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

SPAN 104 – Topics in Spanish Language and Culture
4 hours. Can be used to complete the fourth semester requirement in Spanish. Students work with short literary and cultural readings in Spanish and review some specific grammatical concepts. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access are required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: SPAN 103 and appropriate score on the department placement test or placement by department. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

+Special Education (SPED)

SPED 410 – Survey of Characteristics of Learners with Disabilities
3 hours. Fulfills requirements for Illinois House Bill 150. Field experience required. Learning and personality characteristics of exceptional learners. Diagnostic processes and educational approaches are examined. Prerequisite: ED 210 or ED 421 or graduate standing and consent of the instructor.  Δ online

SPED 465 – Cognitive Development and Disabilities
3 hours. Theory and research on cognitive development in children with disabilities from infancy through adolescence, in the context of typical development. Models for cognitive assessment and intervention. Same as EPSY 465. Field work required. Prerequisite: SPED 461 or ED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

SPED 509 – Educational Implications of Learners with Low-Incidence and Multiple Disabilities
3 hours. Development of knowledge and skills to research, synthesize and apply psychological, sociological, and educational issues for students with multiple and low incidence disabilities. Previously listed as SPED 513. In partial fulfillment of LBSII programs for Behavior Intervention Specialist and Multiple Disabilities Specialist. Prerequisite(s): Must have an LBSI Certificate and Admission to the LBSII Program or admission as a doctorate student or consent of the instructor.

+Statistics (STAT)

STAT 101 – Introduction to Statistics
4 hours. Applications of statistics in the real world, displaying and describing data, normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Credit is not given for STAT 101 for majors in Mathematics and Computer Science, Mathematics, and Teaching of Mathematics. Credit is not given for STAT 101 if the student has credit for STAT 130. Extensive computer use required. This course is offered in both a blended and traditional format. If the section is marked “Blended-Online and Classroom,” use of a computer and internet access is required. Blended sections require students to do some of their coursework online. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggestedPrerequisite: Satisfactory grade in MATH 090, or appropriate score on the Department placement test, or consent of the instructor. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

+Urban Planning And Policy (UPP)

UPP 493 – Topics in Urban Planning and Policy: Bike Planning
1-4 hours. Intensive analysis of selected planning problems or policy issues. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

UPP 493 – Topics in Urban Planning and Policy: Analysis with Excel
1-4 hours. Intensive analysis of selected planning problems or policy issues. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

UPP 493 – Topics in Urban Planning and Policy: Grant Writing
1-4 hours. Intensive analysis of selected planning problems or policy issues. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Students may register for more than one section per term. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

View a PDF of the 8-week undergraduate courses

Δ This symbol means that the course is offered online.

+Accounting (ACTG)

ACTG 210 – Introduction to Financial Accounting
3 hours. Concepts and standards underlying the preparation and analysis of external reports; alternative effects and role of accounting in the business environment and capital markets. Previously listed as ACTG 110. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ACTG 211 – Introduction to Managerial Accounting
3 hours. Management planning and control; cost concepts and measurement; cost accounting systems; analysis of cost and volume-profit relationships; standard costs and variances; and budget preparation. Previously listed as ACTG 111. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisites: ACTG 210 and sophomore standing. Accounting majors need a grade of C or better in ACTG 210. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

ACTG 315 – Intermediate Financial Accounting I
3 hours. Theory and standards related to asset valuation, revenue recognition, gain and loss recognition, and their impact on income measurement and financial position. For satisfactory progress in the Accounting major, students must receive a grade of C or better in ACTG 315. ACTG 315 may be repeated only once. Transfer credit from another College or University is not accepted for ACTG 315. Prerequisites: Average grade of B or higher in ACTG 210 and ACTG 211, with both taken at UIC; or a grade C or better in ACTG 210 or equivalent and ACTG 211 or equivalent and a passing grade in the Accounting Qualifying Exam (AQE). Registration for this course is only through Department of Accounting website. Information on AQE is also available there.

ACTG 316 – Intermediate Financial Accounting II
3 hours. Selected topics in accounting and financial reporting including: cash flow statements, income taxes, long-term debt and leases, investments, derivative securities, and contingencies and employee retirement benefits and stockholders’ equity. Prerequisite: Grade of C in ACTG 315. Important prerequisite information for visiting students

ACTG 326 – Cost Accounting
3 hours. Design of cost accounting systems; alternate costing methods; costing for decision making; budgeting and performance evaluation. Extensive computer use required. For satisfactory progress in the Accounting major, students must receive a C or better in ACTG 326. ACTG 326 may be repeated only once. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ACTG 210 and grade of C or better in ACTG 211.

ACTG 435 – Auditing
3 OR 4 hours. Introduction to the audit function; ethical and legal environment; audit standards; objectives and procedures; materiality and audit risk; sampling; auditing in a computer environment; reporting. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite: ACTG 316. Important prerequisite information for visiting students

ACTG 445 – Federal Income Tax I
3 OR 4 hours. Concepts and provisions of federal income taxation as applicable to individual taxpayers, partnerships, individuals and trusts. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for ACTG 445 if the student has credit for ACTG 508. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite: ACTG 315. Important prerequisite information for visiting students

ACTG 470 – Ethical Environment of Business
3 OR 4 hours. An examination of the decision making process on both the individual and organizational levels. The effect of moral, legal, and economic factors on the decision making process. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): ACTG 211.

ACTG 474 – Accounting Information Systems
3 OR 4 hours. Skills and concepts that enable the documentation, design and use of accounting information systems, understanding transaction cycles, sound internal controls, accounting software and the electronic business environment. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ACTG 210 and Grade of C or better in ACTG 211; and IDS 200.

ACTG 493 – Accounting Cases, Research and Analysis
3 OR 4 hours. Examines US GAAP, alternatives, SEC filings and company financial statements, through cases and research projects using various research methodologies. Satisfies research requirements for CPA candidacy. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): ACTG 316; and ECON 300 or IDS 371.

ACTG 500 – Introduction to Financial Accounting
4 hours. Concepts and principles of financial accounting for preparation and evaluation of external reports and financial statements. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA or M.S. in Accounting or Master of Healthcare Administration program.

ACTG 516 – Financial Statement Analysis
4 hours. Use of financial information by decision makers external to the firm; profitability and risk analysis; financial forecasting and equity valuation. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite: ACTG 502; or approval of the department.

+African American Studies (AAST)

AAST 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as LALS 225 and SOC 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

AAST 294 – Topics in African American Studies: Black Lives Matter
3 hours. “The broad and diverse Black Lives Matter movement captured national attention over the past two years since the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson and the subsequent protests. This course explores the history of Black protest and organizing, and community-police relations.” Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

+Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 105 – Human Evolution
4 hours. Human evolution and variability; methods of assessing fossil evidence for evolutionary change; principles of biological adaptation. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture. Natural World – With Lab course, and Past course.

+Art History (AH)

AH 278 – South Asian Visual Cultures: Art and Colonialism in South Asia
3 hours. Selected topics in the art, architecture, and visual cultures of Asia and Asian diasporas. “This course explores the complex visual culture of protocolonial and colonial South Asia. We will focus on the integral role that art played in colonial relations and construction of Empire. Lectures will be accompanied by an array of visuals that alter between sumptuous displays of wealth and exotica, as well as uncomfortable images of imperial cruelty and colonial misrepresentation. We will investigate nearly three decades of artistic documentation, excess, pleasure, and resistance. The course culminates with a consideration of the contemporary reception of colonialism as seen through Bollywood cinema. Students will be graded on short papers and a final presentation. There is no final exam for this course. This course has no prerequisites; all students are welcome.” Course Information: Same as ASST 278.

+Asian Studies  (ASST)

ASST 278 – South Asian Visual Cultures: Art and Colonialism in South Asia
3 hours. Selected topics in the art, architecture, and visual cultures of Asia and Asian diasporas. “This course explores the complex visual culture of protocolonial and colonial South Asia. We will focus on the integral role that art played in colonial relations and construction of Empire. Lectures will be accompanied by an array of visuals that alter between sumptuous displays of wealth and exotica, as well as uncomfortable images of imperial cruelty and colonial misrepresentation. We will investigate nearly three decades of artistic documentation, excess, pleasure, and resistance. The course culminates with a consideration of the contemporary reception of colonialism as seen through Bollywood cinema. Students will be graded on short papers and a final presentation. There is no final exam for this course. This course has no prerequisites; all students are welcome.” Course Information: Same as AH 278.

+Business Administration (BA)

BA 290 – Business Ethics.
2 hours. A required elective of all non-accounting business majors, to aid our students in the formation of the attitude, disposition and habit of thinking, working and living in an ethical environment.

+Biological Sciences (BIOS) 

BIOS 100 – Biology of Cells and Organisms
5 hours. Processes of cellular and organismic function: cell structure, respiration, photosynthesis, molecular genetics and development, structure and physiology of plants and animals. Lecture, laboratory, and discussion. THIS COURSE IS INTENDED FOR SCIENCE MAJORS. Animals used in instruction. BIOS 100 and BIOS 101 may be taken in any order. Credit is not given for BIOS 104 if the student has credit in BIOS 100 or BIOS 101. Recommended background: Credit in CHEM 112 is strongly recommended. Natural World – With Lab course.

BIOS 101 – Biology of Populations and Communities
5 hours. Species concepts, natural selection, phylogeny, models of population growth, transmission genetics, gene frequency, adaptation, interactions among species in a community, biomes and climate, ecosystem processes, and human impacts on the environment. Animals used in instruction. This course is intended for science majors. BIOS 100 and BIOS 101 may be taken in any order. Credit is not given for BIOS 104 if the student has credit in BIOS 100 or BIOS 101. Natural World – With Lab course.

BIOS 220 – Mendelian and Molecular Genetics
3 hours. Principles of heredity and variation in phage, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. Basic molecular genetics, gene regulation, recombination, DNA replication, transcription, translation. Lecture and discussion. No credit may be applied toward the biological sciences major unless credit is also obtained for BIOS 221. Prerequisites: BIOS 100 and BIOS 101 and credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 232. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 221 – Genetics Laboratory
3 hours. Experiments and demonstrations of classical and molecular genetics using material from Drosophila, corn, rodents, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Animals used in instruction. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in BIOS 220. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 222 – Cell Biology
3 hours. Rationale of experiments that led to the current understanding of organelle biogenesis, cell transport, cell signaling, and the relation of cell structure to cell function. Lecture. Prerequisites: BIOS 100 and CHEM 112 and CHEM 114. Recommended background: CHEM 232. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 230 – Ecology and Evolution
3 hours. Concepts and models of population growth, species interactions, community ecology, and energy and nutrient flow in ecosystems. Genetic basis of evolutionary change through adaptation, natural selection, and other mechanisms. Prerequisite: BIOS 101. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 350 – General Microbiology
3 hours. Ultrastructure, genetics, molecular biology, physiology and metabolism of microorganisms; role of microorganisms in food, water, agriculture, biotechnology, infectious diseases, and immunobiology. Prerequisites: BIOS 100; and credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 130 or CHEM 232. Recommended background: BIOS 101. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

BIOS 351 – Microbiology Laboratory
2 hours. Laboratory experience with pure cultures and sterile techniques; methods of identification of unknown microorganisms; experiments demonstrating principles of microbial genetics, transformation, antibiotic sensitivity and resistance. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in BIOS 350. Important prerequisite information for visiting students

+Biomedical & Health Information Sciences (BHIS)

BHIS 406 – Medical Terminology for Health Information Management
2 hours. An introduction to medical and pharmacology, necessary to understanding the use of clinical vocabularies and classification systems in health information systems. Course information: Extensive computer use required. Meets eight weeks of the semester. Taught fully online. Students must have an active UIC NetID with valid password and access to a computer and the internet. Restricted to students in the Department of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences or consent of the instructor.

+Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 100 Chemistry and Life
5 hours. Principles of structural and environmental chemistry underlying the phenomenon of life on Earth, discussed in a historical, cultural and philosophical framework. Includes weekly two-hour laboratory. Natural World – With Lab course.

CHEM 112 General College Chemistry I
5 hours. Topics in general chemistry, including stoichiometry, periodicity, reaction types, the gaseous state, solution stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, dissolution-precipitation equilibria. Includes a weekly 3-hour lab. Credit is not given for CHEM 112 if the student has credit for CHEM 116. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 101 or adequate performance on the UIC chemistry placement examination. Students with credit in a course equivalent to CHEM 101 from another institution must take the UIC chemistry placement examination. Natural World – With Lab course. Important placement testing and prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 114 General College Chemistry II
5 hours. Topics in general chemistry including phase transitions, thermochemistry, spontaneity/equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetics, bonding, order/symmetry in condensed phases, coordination compounds, descriptive chemistry. Includes a weekly 3-hour lab. Credit is not given for CHEM 114 if the student has credit for CHEM 118. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 112 or the equivalent. Students with an equivalent course from another institution must take the chemistry placement examination. Natural World – With Lab course. Important placement testing and prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 130 Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
5 hours. Chemistry of classes of carbon compounds relevant to life sciences, and an introduction to the structure and metabolism of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 112 or the equivalent. Natural World – With Lab course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 222 Analytical Chemistry
4 hours. Theory and application of chemical equilibria and instrumentation in quantitative analysis. Includes two weekly three-hour laboratories. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 114 or grade of C or better in CHEM 118 or the equivalent. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry I
4 hours. First semester of a one-year sequence. Structure, reactivity, and synthesis of organic molecules. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 114 or grade of C or better in CHEM 118. Recommended background: Concurrent registration in CHEM 233. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 233 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1 hour. Introductory organic chemistry laboratory. Basic organic techniques (distillation, crystallization), reactions (esterification, oxidation, addition, substitution, elimination), instruments (gas and liquid chromatography). Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 232.

CHEM 234 Organic Chemistry II
4 hours. Continuation of CHEM 232. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 232. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 314 – Inorganic Chemistry
4 hours. Chemistry of the main-group elements, coordination chemistry and the transition elements, bioinorganic chemistry. Includes a weekly laboratory. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in CHEM 232 and grade of C or better in CHEM 233. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

CHEM 343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory
3 hours. Experiments demonstrating principles of thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, spectroscopy and quantum mechanics in chemical systems using modern instrumentation and methods of data analysis. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 340 or Grade of C or better in CHEM 342. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

+Civil and Materials Engineering (CME)

CME 201 – Statics
3 hours. Analysis of forces, equilibrium of two- and three-dimensional structures, frames and machines. Friction, centroids, virtual work and energy. Prerequisites: MATH 181 and PHYS 141.

CME 203 – Strength of Materials
3 hours. Relationships between the stresses and strains within a deformable body. Axially loaded members, torsion and the bending of bars. Stress transformation equations. Column theory. Prerequisites: CME 201 and MATH 210.

CME 205 – Structural Analysis I
3 hours. Analysis of trusses, beams and frames. Classical methods and analysis with microcomputers. Displacements, shear and bending moments, influence lines. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): CME 203.

CME 260 – Properties of Materials
3 hours. Introduction to the relationships between composition and microstructure; correlation with physical and mechanical behavior of metals, ceramics, and polymers. Manufacturing methods. Service performance. Materials selection. Credit is not given for CME 260 if the student has credit for CME 261. Prerequisites: CHEM 112 and MATH 181 and PHYS 141.

CME 290 – Engineering Surveying
3 hours. Horizontal and vertical distance measurement, angles and direction, traverses, errors, control and construction surveys, coordinate systems, land records, and coordinate geometry, office and field practice. Course Information: Prerequisite(s): MATH 181; or consent of the instructor.

+Communication (COMM)

COMM 100 – Fundamentals of Human Communication
3 hours. Emphasis on strategies for public speaking and conducting meetings. Effective approaches to audience analysis, speaker credibility, using evidence, argument development, speech delivery, and planning meetings. No credit given toward the Major in Communication. Individual and Society course.

COMM 101 – Introduction to Communication
3 hours. Introduction to central concepts in communication, including key terms and theories, specific contexts and key debates. Individual and Society course. Δ online

COMM 102 – Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
3 hours. Effective communication in human relationships; verbal and nonverbal messages; reflective listening, disclosure, showing affection, empathy, assertiveness; handling interpersonal conflict; cultural and gender differences. Individual and Society course.

COMM 103 – Introduction to Media
3 hours. Conceptualizing mass communication. Internal and external controls. Media and minorities. Individual and societal functions of the media. Individual and societal effects of the media. Individual and Society course.

COMM 200 – Communication Technologies
3 hours. History, development, and social impact of communication technology: print, broadcast, cable, satellite, computer, internet. Issues related to infrastructure, regulation, access, globalization, conveyance, and change. Course Information: Same as MOVI 200. This is a blended-online and classroom course. Use of computer and internet access is required. A high speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisite(s): COMM 101, COMM 102, and COMM 103 with a grade of B or better in at least two of these; Moving Image Arts minors must obtain approval of the Department of Communication.  Δ Online

COMM 474 – Internship
1-8 hours. Students work in an approved professional setting. Individual projects developed through conferences with a faculty member and a field supervisor. Course Information: May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. A maximum of three hours may be counted toward the undergraduate communication major requirements. May not be counted toward the minimum Master of Arts degree requirements. Prerequisite(s): 12 hours of upper-division courses in communication, with a 3.00 grade point average in those courses; recommendation of two faculty members and approval of the department obtained in the semester prior to internship.

+Computer Science (CS)

CS 109 – C/C ++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab
3 hours. Program design using C/C++: Data types and operators, control structures, functions, file I/O, arrays and structures. Engineering applications: Matrices, equation solution, MatLab. Programming assignments. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisites: Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 180.

CS 141 – Program Design II
3 hours. Data abstraction and modular design; recursion; lists and stacks; dynamic memory allocation; file manipulation; programming exercises.  Extensive computer use required. Credit is not given for CS 141 if the student has credit for CS 102 or CS 107. Prerequisite(s): CS 109 or CS 111; and credit or concurrent registration in MATH 180. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory-Discussion and one Lecture-Discussion.

CS 151 – Mathematical Foundations of Computing
3 hours. Discrete mathematics concepts fundamental to computing: propositional logic, predicates and quantifiers; proofs; sets; recursive definitions and induction; functions, relations and graphs; combinatorics and discrete probability; applications. Credit is not given for CS 151 if the student has credit in MCS 361. Prerequisite(s): MATH 180; and Grade of C or better in CS 111. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion.

CS 301 – Languages and Automata
3 hours. Regular sets and finite automata. Context-free languages and push-down automata. Parsing. Computability theory including Turing machines and decidability. Previously listed as EECS 361. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in CS 151 or grade of C or better in CS 201; and credit or concurrent registration in CS 251. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Discussion/Recitation and one Lecture.

CS 401 – Computer Algorithms I
3 OR 4 hours. Design and analysis of computer algorithms. Divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy method, backtracking. Algorithms for sorting, searching, graph computations, pattern matching, NP-complete problems. Same as MCS 401. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MCS 360; or Grade of C or better in CS 202.

CS 480 – Database Systems
3 OR 4 hours. Database design, logical design, physical design. Relational databases. Recovery, concurrency control. Normalization. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Previously listed as EECS 480. Prerequisite(s): CS 202.

+Criminology, Law, and Justice (CLJ)

CLJ 101 – Introduction to Criminology, Law, and Justice
3 hours. The study of the development and contemporary operations of criminal justice agencies, from police through probation and parole, focusing upon “power elites” and the use of discretion. US Society course.

CLJ 120 – Crime and Society
3 hours. Provides an introduction to theories of social deviance and control. The historical development, empirical basis, strengths, and limitations of various theories are analyzed. This course may be taught in a blended-online and classroom format. When that is the case, use of a computer and Internet access will be required. A high-speed connection is strongly recommended. Please check the online class schedule for blended-online sections. US Society course.

CLJ 200 – Law in Society
3 hours. Development of law and legal institutions from historical, comparative, and contemporary perspectives; interrelationships of law, custom, morality, and social change; the legal profession. Prerequisite: CLJ 101. US Society course.

CLJ 220 – Criminology
3 hours. Introductory survey of the literature developed by criminologists in their study of crime in American society. Same as SOC 231. Prerequisite(s): CLJ 101.

CLJ 240 – Criminal Justice Organizations
3 hours. Theories of complex organizations, organization behavior, and administration relating to criminal justice and other rule-applying agencies. Prerequisite: CLJ 101.

CLJ 262 – Research Methods II
3 hours. Statistical data analysis in the criminology, law, and justice context. Probability, t-tests, correlation, regression, sampling theory, tests of significance. Problems with police and crime survey data. Prerequisites: CLJ 261; and one of the following: MATH 090 or MATH 092 or MATH 118.

CLJ 345 – Police in Society
3 hours. The functions and organization of police/investigative agencies, especially those on the local level, the nature of the experience of being a police officer. Prerequisite(s): CLJ 101 and CLJ 240 and one other 200-level criminology, law, and justice course; or consent of the instructor.

+Curriculum and Instruction (CI)

All CI courses listed below begin 6/13/16 and end 7/22/16.

CI 464  Bilingualism and Literacy in a Second Language
4 hours. Theoretical foundations of second language acquisition and the teaching of English as second language. Methods and materials for teaching reading and writing in bilingual/ESL settings. Prerequisite: CI 481 or ED 258; or consent of the instructor.

CI 472 – Language Proficiency Assessment and ESL Instruction
4 hours. English language proficiency assessment instruments and procedures; effective planning and ESL instructional practices; methods, materials, and technology resources for teaching ESL in K-12 school settings. Prerequisite: CI 481 or ED 258; or consent of the instructor.

CI 481 – Foundations and Current Issues in Educating English Language Learners
4 hours. Philosophical, theoretical, socio-cultural and educational examination of learning and achievement issues that culturally and linguistically diverse students face in American schools. Field work required. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

CI 482 – Assessment and Instruction: A Multilingual/Multicultural Perspective
4 hours. Methods and materials for teaching English language learners (ELLs) in bilingual/ESL classrooms. Emphasis upon curricular and methodological practices, assessment for academic placement, and instruction. Prerequisite: CI 481 or ED 258; or consent of the instructor.

CI 504  Secondary Literacy
4 hours. Focuses on the foundations of literacy and on the literacy processes of middle and secondary students and how these processes apply to reading and writing in the disciplines. Field work required.

CI 540  Linguistics for Teachers
4 hours. Introduction to linguistic concepts as they apply to teaching in monolingual and bilingual classrooms. Relation of linguistic theory to theories of language and cognition.

+Economics (ECON)

ECON 120 – Principles of Microeconomics
4 hours. Scarcity and choice, price system, decision making by consumers, individual and market demand, optimal input decisions by firms, perfect and imperfect competition, international trade. Credit is not given for ECON 120 if the student has credit for ECON 130. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

ECON 121 – Principles of Macroeconomics
4 hours. Determinants of the level of economic activity, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, the roles of fiscal and monetary policies, exchange rates, international trade. Credit is not given for ECON 121 if the student has credit for ECON 130. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

ECON 216 – Economics of Sports and Entertainment
3 hours. Analysis of economic issues in the sports and entertainment industries–industrial organization, financing, pricing, labor, and regulatory issues. Prerequisite(s): ECON 120.

ECON 220  – Microeconomics: Theory and Applications
3 hours. The price system, consumer behavior, market demand, the firm’s technology and costs, perfect and imperfect competition, government regulation, general equilibrium and resource allocation, applications. Prerequisite(s): ECON 120 and MATH 121.

ECON 270 – Statistics for Economics
4 hours. Descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing. Credit is not given for ECON 270 if the student has credit for IDS 270. Prerequisite: MATH 160.

ECON 300 – Econometrics
3 hours. Specification of economic models; measurement of variables; estimation of economic relationships and testing of economic hypotheses; ordinary least squares regression and extensions. Credit is not given for ECON 300 if the student has credit in ECON 400. Previously listed as ECON 346. Prerequisite(s): ECON 120 or ECON 121; and either ECON 270 or IDS 270.

+Education (ED)

All ED courses listed below begin 6/13/16 and end 7/22/16.

ED 402 – Philosophy of Education and Urban School Policy
3 hours. Selected social and education philosophies and their impact on urban school curriculum design, school organization and control.

ED 403 – Policy Issues in the History of American Education
3 hours. Political, economic, and cultural influences shaping the development of American education policy; emphasis on issues of education theory and practice in their historical settings.

ED 421 – Advanced Educational Psychology
3 hours. Examines current theory and research on the teaching-learning process with particular attention to general learning and curriculum-relevant problem solving skills. Prerequisite: ED 210 or graduate standing.

ED 445 – Adolescence and the Schools
3 hours. Physiological, intellectual, and social development of adolescence. Relations between aspects of adolescent development and the academic and social demands of secondary schools. Prerequisite(s): EPSY 210, or the equivalent, or graduate standing.

ED 503 – Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education
4 hours. Introduces theory and assumptions behind parametric statistics. Also provides hands-on experience in conducting basic quantitative research (t-test, correlation, regression, analysis of variance). Same as EPSY 503. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. in Education program or consent of the instructor.

ED 505  – Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes
4 hours. Offers a survey introduction to the history, contexts, paradigms and orientations, ethics, and processes of educational research. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Admission to one of the PhD programs in the College of Education or consent of the instructor.

+Educational Policy Studies (EDPS)

All EDPS courses listed below begin 6/13/16 and end 7/22/16.

EDPS 535 – Human Development for School Leaders
4 hours. Deepens school leaders’ understanding of human development across the lifespan, from birth to adult learning in schools; includes attention to differentiated instruction, SPED inclusion, and ELL learners in all age groups. Same as EPSY 535. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

EDPS 544 – Research Design in EDPS
4 hours. Alternative research design models and evaluation methodologies; quantitative and qualitative approaches; ethnography; historiography; experimentation and quasi-experimentation; institutional and practitioner research designs and methods. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor or admission to the Ph.D. in Policy Studies in Urban Education, or the Ed.D. in Urban School Leadership.

EDPS 551  Cycles of Inquiry for Improving Schools
4 hours. Introduces an integrated model of school assessment practices that bridges the gap between internal and external assessment; introduces descriptive statistics, data representation and cycles of inquiry as core drivers of continuous improvement. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

EDPS 568  Education and the Law
4 hours. Legal rights, responsibilities, and authority of students, parents, teachers, administrators, boards, and government units in relation to schools. Legal issues in education policy and practice. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

EDPS 592 – Professional Career Training in Educational Policy Studies
1-4 hours. Faculty supervised training through university teaching, research or field-based practice. May be repeated to a maximum of 16 hours. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor and approval of the Department Chairperson.

+Educational Psychology (EPSY)

All EPSY courses listed below begin 6/13/16 and end 7/22/16.

EPSY 100 – Introduction to Human Development and Learning
3 hours. Examines basic concepts and theories in human development. Discusses relationships between biological, cognitive, social, and cultural aspects of development with learning across the lifespan. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

EPSY 446 – Characteristics of Early Adolescence
3 hours. Physiological, social, emotional and cognitive development of early adolescence. The relationship between these developmental characteristics and success in the middle grades. Same as PSCH 423. Prerequisites: ED 210 or ED 421 or ED 422 or PSCH 422 or the equivalent, and approval of the College of Education; or admission to the Ph.D. in Psychology program; or consent of the instructor.

EPSY 467 – Social and Emotional Development and Disabilities
3 hours. Exploration of the risk factors and different theoretical approaches associated with the social and emotional development of youth ages 5-21 with and without disabilities. Same as SPED 467. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): SPED 461 or ED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

EPSY 482 – Collaborating with Families, Community, and Professionals
3 hours. Explores the dynamics of professional collaboration with families, addressing characteristics, structures, and processes of collaboration for children and youth with and without disabilities. Same as SPED 482. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): SPED 461, applicable to SPED M.Ed. students only; or consent of the instructor. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

EPSY 503 – Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education
4 hours. Introduces theory and assumptions behind parametric statistics. Also provides hands-on experience in conducting basic quantitative research (t-test, correlation, regression, analysis of variance). Same as ED 503. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. in Education program or consent of the instructor.

EPSY 504 – Rating Scale and Questionnaire Design and Analysis
4 hours. Development and administration of rating scales and questionnaires, analysis of data, and reporting of results. The focus is on rating scales. Same as PSCH 504. Previously listed as EPSY 550. Prerequisite(s): ED 501, and ED 503 or EPSY 503 or the equivalents or consent of the instructor. Δ online

EPSY 535 – Human Development for School Leaders
4 hours. Deepens school leaders’ understanding of human development across the lifespan, from birth to adult learning in schools; includes attention to differentiated instruction, SPED inclusion, and ELL learners in all age groups. Same as EDPS 535. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

+Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

ECE 225 – Circuit Analysis
4 hours. Electric circuit elements; Ohm’s Law; Kirchhoff’s laws; transient and steady-state analysis of circuits; Laplace transform methods; network theorems. Laboratory. Credit is not given for ECE 225 if the student has credit for ECE 210. Prerequisites: MATH 220; and Grade of C or better in PHYS 142; and Grade of C or better in ECE 115.

ECE 267 – Computer Organization I
3 hours. Introduction to computer organization and assembly language programming. Memory, CPU, and I/O organization. Programming techniques and tools. Prerequisite(s): CS 107; and credit or concurrent registration in ECE 265.

ECE 340 – Electronics I
4 hours. Operational amplifiers. Semiconductor junctions. Bipolar and field-effect transistors. Simple transistor amplifier and switching applications. Introduction to digital logic circuits. Laboratory experience. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ECE 225.

ECE 341 – Probability and Random Processes for Engineers
3 hours. Probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, transformation of random variables, expectation, generating functions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, estimation, random processes, stationarity, applications. Credit is not given for ECE 341 if the student has credit for IE 342. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in ECE 310.

ECE 346 – Solid State Device Theory
4 hours. Introduction to semiconductors, Energy bands, Electron and hole transport mechanisms in semiconductor devices, recombination and generation, P-N Junctions. Intro to metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. Practical laboratory. Prerequisite(s): MATH 220 and a grade of C or better in ECE 115 and a grade of C or better in PHYS 142.

+English (ENGL)

 

ENGL 120 – Film and Culture
3 hours. Analysis of representative works that reflect the relationship between cinema and its cultural context. Creative Arts, and Individual and Society course.

ENGL 161 – Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3 hours. Students learn about academic inquiry and complete several writing projects including a documented research paper. Topics vary by section. Prerequisite: ENGL 160 or the equivalent. All students take the Writing Placement Test. If students place into ESL 050, ESL 060, ENGL 150, ENGL 152 or ENGL 160, the student must take that course (or courses) prior to enrolling in ENGL 161. Students with an ACT English subscore of 27 or higher receive a waiver of ENGL 160 and permission to enroll in ENGL 161. Important placement testing and prerequisite information for visiting students.

ENGL 242 – English Literature II: 1660 to 1900
3 hours. A survey of significant works of English Literature, 1660 – 1900, their historical, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions, from a number of critical perspectives. Prerequisite: Completion of the University Writing requirement or concurrent registration in ENGL 161 or ENGL 171. Recommended background: 3 hours of English from ENGL 101-123.

ENGL 243 – American Literature: Beginnings to 1900
3 hours. A survey of significant works of American literature, beginnings to 1900, their cultural, historical, and aesthetic dimensions, from a number of critical perspectives. Prerequisite: Completion of the University Writing requirement or concurrent registration in ENGL 161 or ENGL 171. Recommended background: 3 hours of English from English 101-123.

ENGL 305 – Studies in Fiction
3 hours. Survey of a topic or a movement in fiction. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ENGL 240; and Grade of C or better in ENGL 241 or Grade of C or better in ENGL 242 or Grade of C or better in ENGL 243. Recommended background: ENGL 105 or 106.

ENGL 491 – Advanced Writing Fiction
3 or 4 hours. Advanced practice; emphasis on analysis of student work and published examples. May be repeated up to 1 time(s) by undergraduates. Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in ENGL 212.

+Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

ENTR 310  Introduction to Entrepreneurship
This course begins 6/20/16 and ends 8/14/16.

3 hours. Introduction to the concepts of entrepreneurship, opportunity recognition, characteristics of entrepreneurs, creativity, the role of the entrepreneur in the economy and society, and entrepreneurship in non-entrepreneurial settings. Prerequisites: BA 200 and ENGL 161. Δ Online

ENTR 560 – Technology Entrepreneurship
2 hours. Provides an understanding of what it takes to create, fund and launch a technology-based new business venture. Credit is not given ENTR 560 if the student has credit in ENTR 554. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

ENTR 561 – Assessing Technologies
2 hours. Provides an understanding of the discovery, evaluation, legal protection and commercialization of new inventions. Projects completed develop skills in assessing technologies for commercial potential. Credit is not given ENTR 561 if the student has credit in ENTR 554. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

+Finance (FIN)

FIN 302 – Introduction to Investments
3 hours. Introduces students to investments: risk/return, models of risk, efficient markets, derivative securities, fixed income securities, international aspects. Current events and policy issues are discussed.

FIN 430 – Introduction to Money and Banking
3 hours. The principles of management of corporations in the financial services industry, emphasizing commercial bank management and risk. Methodology includes computerized bank management simulation or case studies. Prerequisite(s): FIN 300.

FIN 500 – Introduction to Corporate Finance
4 hours. Theory of corporate finance: goal of the firm, time value of money, investment decisions (under certainty and uncertainty), net present value, capital markets, and corporate financing decisions. Prerequisites: Credit or concurrent registration in ACTG 500 and FIN 500.

FIN 594 – Fixed Income
4 hours. Develops the tools for evaluating and quantifying the value of fixed-income securities. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

+Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS)

GWS 102 – Global Perspectives on Women and Gender
3 hours. “This course examines how the experience of women and meanings of gender are shaped locally, globally and transnationally by various systems (e.g. racism, capitalism, patriarchy, colonialism, militarism, etc.). Furthermore, because the conditions that women live in are not simple, neither are the ways in which women respond to these conditions. Through lectures, readings, films, and discussion, we will explore how the forms of inequalities that women experience in one place or time are linked to the inequalities in another place. In doing so, students can being to understand the broad range of experience of women in a global context.” Individual and Society course, and World Cultures course.

GWS 224 – Gender and Society
3 hours. Sociological perspectives on gender as a factor in social stratification; gender role acquisition; individual and social consequences of changing social definitions of gender roles. Same as SOC 224. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or GWS 101 or GWS 102. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

GWS 315 – Psychology of Women and Gender
3 hours. Critical examination of research on women and gender across the life span, including psychological aspects of reproduction, and the way that gender shapes cognition, sexuality, family, friendship, and work experiences. Same as PSCH 315. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in PSCH 242 or consent of the instructor.

+Geology (GEOG)

GEOG 469 – GIS for Planners
4 hours. Applications of Geographic Information Systems to urban planning and policy making. Course Information: Same as UPP 461.  Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor. Priority registration will be given to students admitted to a campus certificate program in Geospatial Analysis and Visualization, graduate students in Urban Planning and Policy, or students in the Master of Arts in Real Estate program.

+Germanic Studies (GER)

GER 217 – German Cinema
4 hours. German cinema as communication and art; its production, reception and ideological perspectives. Taught in English. No knowledge of German required. Area literature/culture. Creative Arts, and World Cultures course. Δ online

+History (HIST)

HIST 101 –Western Civilization Since 1648
3 hours. Introduction to the development of Western civilization in the early modern and modern world. Past, and World Cultures course.

HIST 105 – Global Transformations and the Rise of the West Since 1000
3 hours. Overview of historical transformations that led to the rise of Europe and the wider West to global preeminence. Emphasizes contributions of other world cultures to this development. Same as INST 105. 3 hours. This class may be taught in an online format. When that is the case, internet access will be required. A high-speed connection is strongly suggested. Please check the online class schedule for online sections. Past course, and World Cultures course.   Δ online 

+Human Nutrition (HN)

HN 110 – Foods
3 hours. The principles of food components, component interactions, food selection, preparation and service.

HN 202 – Culture and Food
2 hours. Provides a perspective on factors that affect the development of food habits, similarities and differences across cultures, and how the use of foods provides a window to multiculturalism. Previously listed as HN 302. World Cultures course.

HN 203 – Culture and Food Lab
2 hours. Practical application of accurately preparing, presenting, and modifying cultural specific foods. Field trip required at a nominal fee Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

+Industrial Engineering (IE)

IE 342 – Probability and Statistics for Engineers  
3 hours. Probability, random variables, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation theory, and test of hypothesis. Prerequisite: MATH 181.

+Information and Decision Sciences (IDS)

IDS 200 – Introduction to Management Information Systems
4 hours. Introduction to concepts and application of information technology for solving business problems and supporting organizational functions. Includes hands-on instruction on use of computer-based productivity tools.

IDS 270 – Business Statistics I
4 hours. Survey of concepts and techniques for business applications of statistics. Use of computer software for tabulation and analysis of data. Prerequisite: MATH 160 or MATH 165. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

IDS 355 – Operations Management
3 hours. Application of management sciences to the planning and design of production, distribution, and service systems. Prerequisites: IDS 200 and IDS 270 and ENGL 161 and ECON 218.

IDS 371 – Business Statistics II
3 hours. Continuation of survey of statistical concepts and techniques for operational and managerial decisions. Use of computer software for analysis of data. Prerequisites: IDS 270 and MATH 165.

IDS 401 – Business Object Programming Using Java
4 hours. Basic concepts in object-oriented programming such as objects, classes, class inheritance and interfaces, data abstraction and encapsulation, polymorphism, and dynamic binding. Prerequisite(s): IDS 201 or the equivalent. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

IDS 410 – Business Database Technology
3 OR 4 hours. Computer software techniques used in business with emphasis on information management and database management systems. Data management and analysis. Major types of database management systems, query languages. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: IDS 201 or IDS 331.

IDS 532 – Introduction to Operations Management 
4 hours. The management of operations for the production and delivery of goods and services. Topics include the management of projects, production, supply chain, inventory, and quality. Credit is not given for IDS 532 if the student has credit in MBA 507 and MBA 509. Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA Program. Δ online

IDS 570 – Statistics for Management
4 hours. Survey of statistical methods with applications for business and management. Prerequisite(s): Admission to any business graduate program or consent of the instructor.

IDS 594 – Special Topics in Information and Decision Sciences.
1-4 hours. Intensive study of a selected topic. Content varies. Topics are announced. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

+International Studies (INST)

INST 105 – Global Transformations and the Rise of the West Since 1000
3 hours. Overview of historical transformations that led to the rise of Europe and the wider West to global preeminence. Emphasizes contributions of other world cultures to this development. Same as HIST 105. 3 hours. This class may be taught in an online format. When that is the case, internet access will be required. A high-speed connection is strongly suggested. Please check the online class schedule for online sections. Past course.

+Kinesiology (KN)

KN 243 – Basic Fitness Assessment
3 hours. This introductory-level course addresses screening and assesses fitness components necessary to assess posture, body composition, strength, flexibility and cardio-respiratory endurance. Extensive use of instrumentation. Prerequisite(s): KN 136. To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Lecture-Discussion.

KN 345 – Exercise Assessment and Programming
3 hours. Provides a variety of experiences in conducting advanced assessment and programming techniques and approaches to exercise, fitness, health and sport. Prerequisite(s): KN 136 and KN 240 and KN 243 and junior standing or above; or approval of the department.

KN 352 – Physiology of Exercise
4 hours. The physiological responses associated with acute and chronic physical exercise; muscular, circulatory, respiratory and nervous systems. Prerequisite: KN 252. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

+Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS)

LALS 127 – Latin American Music
3 hours. Survey class that introduces students to the rich repertoire of music in Latin America. It explores the history of genres, their development, instruments and representative artists in their geographical, social and cultural contexts. Same as MUS 127. Creative Arts course, and World Cultures course.

LALS 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as AAST 225 and SOC 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

+Management (MGMT)

MGMT 350 – Business and Its External Environment
3 hours. Concerns the political, economic, social, legal, regulatory and international environment of business and the ethics and social responsibility of business actions. Prerequisite: ENGL 161 and MATH 160.

MGMT 452 – Organizational Behavior
3 hours. Emphasis on understanding and managing people at work. Analysis of individual, group and organization topics including leadership, motivation, attitudes, group dynamics, and organizational culture. Prerequisites: Junior standing and MGMT 340.

MGMT 453 – Human Resource Management
3 hours. Examination of the activities involved in attracting, retaining, and motivating employees. Topics include planning, selection, compensation, performance appraisal, succession, and legal issues. Prerequisites: MGMT 340 and MGMT 350 and junior standing.

MGMT 495 – Competitive Strategy
4 hours. Multidisciplinary analysis of organization strategy and policy, using case method and/or business simulation. Assignments involve extensive library research and oral and written reports. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the College of Business Administration and completion of all other CBA core courses, or consent of the instructor.

MGMT 564 – Negotiations
4 hours. Strategies and techniques for successful agreement negotiation and business conflict resolution. Includes applications to classic situations such as collective bargaining, interpersonal relations, and stakeholder concerns. Credit is not given for MGMT 564 if the student has credit for MGMT 594. Special topics: Negotiations. Prerequisite: MGMT 541.

MGMT 590 – Strategic Management
4 hours. Study of strategies and policies that influence the long-term survival, growth, and character of business firms; strategy formulation and implementation in domestic and international organizations. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the final year of the MBA program.

+Marketing (MKTG)

MKTG 360 – Introduction to Marketing
3 hours. The role of marketing in business and society. The marketing decision process in domestic and international settings. Required of all students in the College of Business Administration. Prerequisite: ENGL 161.

MKTG 461 – Consumer Market Behavior
3 hours. Understanding consumer decision processes; steps in decision making, including need recognition, perception, cognition and attitude formation; effect of environmental social, psychological, and individual difference factors on consumer decision making. Prerequisite: MKTG 360 or consent of the instructor.

MKTG 465 – Strategic Marketing Planning and Management
3 hours. Development of marketing plans for strategic and tactical programs to achieve the firm’s marketing objectives. Prerequisites: 15 hours of marketing.

MKTG 500 – Introduction to Marketing
4 hours. Client/consumer behavior and the way institutions respond to such behavior through the planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and services. Credit is not given for MKTG 500 if the student has credit for MBA 506. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Business Administration or consent of the instructor.

MKTG 560  Marketing Management
4 hours. The structural system for the management of marketing: environmental considerations; goal determinations; the sequential process; marketing planning; product-market integration; channel components; demand stimulation; evaluation and audit. Prerequisite: MKTG 500 or consent of the instructor.

+Mathematical Computer Science (MCS)

MCS 260 – Introduction to Computer Science
4 hours. Computer literacy, number systems, concepts of operation systems, storage, files, databases, logic gates, circuits, networks, internet. Introduction to programming in Python, variables, assignments, functions, objects. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 180. Natural World – No Lab course.

MCS 401 – Computer Algorithms I
3 OR 4 hours. Design and analysis of computer algorithms. Divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy method, backtracking. Algorithms for sorting, searching, graph computations, pattern matching, NP-complete problems. Same as CS 401. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MCS 360; or Grade of C or better in CS 202.

+Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 121 – Precalculus Mathematics
5 hours. Logarithms, radicals, graphing of rational functions, complex numbers, trigonometry, DeMoivre’s formula, theory of equations, sequences, systems of linear equations. No credit for students who have credit in MATH 165, MATH 180, or MATH 205. No graduation credit for architecture, business administration, or engineering students. Prerequisite: MATH 090 or MATH 092 or appropriate performance on the UIC mathematics placement test.

MATH 165 – Calculus for Business
5 hours. Introduction to differential and integral calculus of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions and techniques of partial derivatives and optimization. Emphasis on business applications. Credit is not given for MATH 165 if the student has credit for MATH 180. Prerequisite: Math 090 or grade of C or better in Math 121 or appropriate performance on the UIC mathematics placement test. Natural World – No Lab course. 

MATH 180 – Calculus I 
5 hours. Differentiation, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, related rates, mean-value theorem, antiderivative, Riemann integral, logarithm, and exponential functions. Credit is not given for MATH 180 if the student has credit for MATH 165. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Math 121 or appropriate performance on the department placement test. Natural World – No Lab course. Important placement testing and prerequisite information for visiting students.

MATH 181 – Calculus II
5 hours. Techniques of integration, arc length, solids of revolution, applications, polar coordinates, parametric equations, infinite sequences and series, power series. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 180. Natural World – No Lab course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

MATH 210 – Calculus III
3 hours. Vectors in the plane and space, vector valued functions, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maximum-minimum problems, double and triple integrals, applications, Green’s theorem. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 181. Natural World – No Lab course.

MATH 220 – Introduction to Differential Equations
3 hours. Techniques and applications of differential equations. First order equations: separable and linear. Linear second order equations, Laplace transforms, and series solutions. Graphical and numerical methods. Fourier series and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 310 – Applied Linear Algebra
3 hours. Matrices, Gaussian elimination, vector spaces, LU-decomposition, orthogonality, Gram-Schmidt process, determinants, inner products, eigenvalue problems, applications to differential equations and Markov processes. Credit is not given for MATH 310 if the student has credit for MATH 320. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

MATH 417 – Complex Analysis with Applications
3 OR 4 hours. Complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, Taylor and Laurent series, residue calculus, branch cuts, conformal mapping, argument principle, Rouche’s theorem, Poisson integral formula, analytic continuation. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Grade C or better in MATH 210.

+Mechanical Engineering (ME)

ME 205 – Introduction to Thermodynamics
3 hours. Principles of energy transport and work; properties of substances and equations of state; first and second laws of thermodynamics; applications to mechanical cycles and systems. Prerequisites: PHYS 141 and MATH 181.

ME 210 – Engineering Dynamics
3 hours. Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Introduction to Linear Algebra. Kinematics in different coordinate systems, coordinate transformations. Kinetics: Newton’s second law, work energy relations, impulse-momentum relations, impact problems. Prerequisite: CME 201.

ME 428 – Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering
3 OR 4 hours. Introduction to numerical solution methods for problems in mechanical engineering. Example problems include heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, mechanical vibrations, dynamics, stress analysis, and other related problems. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisites: CS 108 and senior standing.

+Moving Image Arts (MOVI)

MOVI 200 – Communication Technologies
3 hours. History, development, and social impact of communication technology: print, broadcast, cable, satellite, computer, internet. Issues related to infrastructure, regulation, access, globalization, conveyance, and change. Same as COMM 200. This is a blended-online and classroom course. Use of computer and internet access is required. A high speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisite(s): COMM 101, COMM 102, COMM 103 with a grade of B or better in at least two of these. Moving Image Arts minors must obtain approval of the Department of Communication.

+Music (MUS)

MUS 127 – Latin American Music
3 hours. Survey class that introduces students to the rich repertoire of music in Latin America. It explores the history of genres, their development, instruments and representative artists in their geographical, social and cultural contexts. Same as LALS 127. Creative Arts course, and World Cultures course.

+Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 100 – Introduction to Philosophy
3 hours. A survey of traditional problems concerning the existence and nature of God, freedom, justification, morality, etc. Readings from historical or contemporary philosophers. Individual and Society course.

PHIL 102 – Introductory Logic
3 hours. Sentential logic: representation of English using truth-functional connectives, decision methods, natural deduction techniques. Introduction to predicate logic: representation of English using quantifiers. “What makes Sherlock Holmes a good detective? He uses deductive reasoning to reach his conclusions to solve cases, meaning he arrives at his conclusions with logical certainty. In this course we will explore fundamental concepts of deductive reasoning in symbolic logic. Students will develop powerful skills to reason well and think abstractly. This course fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.” Natural World – No Lab course.

PHIL 107 – What is Art?
3 hours. Introduction to the fundamental problems in understanding art; the historical background; the concept of the aesthetic; theories of art; intentionalistic criticism; metaphor; symbolism; expression; theories of evaluation. Creative Arts course.

+Physics (PHYS)

PHYS 105 – Introductory Physics I – Lecture
4 hours. A non-calculus course. One-dimensional and two-dimensional kinematics; Newton’s laws; momentum; work and energy; torque and angular momentum; rotational dynamics; universal gravitation; oscillations; waves; physical optics; special relativity. Credit is not given for PHYS 105 if the student has credit in PHYS 141. Students may obtain one additional hour of credit by concurrently registering in PHYS 104. Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry. Natural World – No Lab course.

PHYS 106 – Introductory Physics I – Laboratory
1 hour. One-dimensional and two-dimensional kinematics; Newton’s laws; momentum; work and energy; torque and angular momentum; rotational dynamics; universal gravitation; oscillations; waves; physical optics; special relativity. Credit is not given for PHYS 106 if the student has credit for PHYS 141. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: High school algebra and trigonometry. Natural World – With Lab course.

PHYS 107 – Introductory Physics II – Lecture
4 hours. Non-calculus course. Electrostatics; electric current; magnetism; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s relations; electromagnetic radiation; introduction to quantum mechanics; the Heisenberg uncertainty principle; Bohr model; nuclear physics; particle physics. Credit is not given for PHYS 107 if the student has credit for PHYS 142. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in PHYS 105 and Grade of C or better in PHYS 106. Natural World – No Lab course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PHYS 108 – Introductory Physics II – Laboratory
1 hour. Electrostatic; electric current; magnetism; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s relations; electromagnetic radiation; optics, introduction to quantum mechanics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle; Bohr model; nuclear physics; particle physics. Credit is not given for PHYS 108 if the student has credit for PHYS 142. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in PHYS 105 and Grade of C or better in PHYS 106. Natural World – With Lab course.

PHYS 141 – General Physics I (Mechanics)
4 hours. Kinematics, vectors, Newton’s laws of motion; linear momentum, impulse collisions; work and kinetic energy; potential energy, conservation of energy; rotational kinematics and energy; rotational dynamics, static equilibrium; simple harmonic motion. Credit is not given if the student has credit in PHYS 105 or PHYS 106. Students may obtain one additional hour of credit by concurrently registering in PHYS 144. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 180 or consent of the instructor. Natural World – With Lab course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PHYS 142 – General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)
4 hours. Electrostatics; electric currents; d-c circuits; magnetic fields; magnetic media; electromagnetic induction; a-c circuits; Maxwell’s equations; electromagnetic waves; reflection and refraction; interference. Credit is not given for PHYS 142 if the student has credit in PHYS 107 or PHYS 108. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MATH 181 and Grade of C or better in PHYS 141 or consent of the instructor. Natural World – With Lab course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

+Political Science (POLS)

POLS 210 – Introduction to Urban Politics
3 hours. Growth and legal problems of cities: intergovernmental relations; powers and forms of government; pressure group activity; municipal functions and services; and revenue problems. Prerequisite(s): POLS 101 or POLS 103 or POLS 190.

+Psychology (PSCH)

PSCH 100 – Introduction to Psychology
4 hours. Survey of basic concepts of contemporary psychology. Introduction to the nervous system, perception, motivation, learning and memory, social behavior, personality, developmental and clinical psychology. Students under 18 years of age need parental consent to participate in research experiments that are part of the course. Instructions for obtaining parental consent will be provided during class early in the semester. Individual and Society course.  Δ Online

PSCH 210 – Theories of Personality
3 hours. Survey of major theoretical approaches to the study of personality and the evidential basis underlying each approach. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 100. Individual and Society course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 242 – Introduction to Research in Psychology
3 hours. Techniques and problems associated with the study of behavior. Emphasis on measurement, descriptive statistics, and the principles of experimental design. Exercises involving data collection. Participation in research. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in PSCH 100. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 270 – Abnormal Psychology
3 hours. A survey course covering the assessment, description, causes, and treatments of many psychological disorders, including depression, anxiety disorders, psychosis, sexual dysfunction, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: PSCH 100. Individual and Society course. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 315 – Psychology of Women and Gender
3 hours. Critical examination of research on women and gender across the life span, including psychological aspects of reproduction, and the way that gender shapes cognition, sexuality, family, friendship, and work experiences. Same as GWS 315. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in PSCH 242 or consent of the instructor.

PSCH 320 – Developmental Psychology
3 hours. Analysis of research and theory concerning social, cognitive, and biopsychological aspects of human development. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in PSCH 242. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 340  Psychological Testing
3 hours. Introduction to principles of psychological assessment, with an overview of representative techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on objective tests. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in PSCH 242. Important prerequisite information for visiting students.

PSCH 343 – Statistical Methods in Behavioral Science
4 hours. Introduction to statistical inference, probability distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and analysis of variance. Credit is not given for PSCH 343 if the student has credit for IDS 371. Prerequisites: PSCH 242 and ENGL 161 with a minimum grade of C; MATH 118 (or the equivalent) with a minimum grade of C or MATH 090; or consent of the instructor. For psychology majors only.

PSCH 381 – Psychology of Interviewing
3 hours. Theory, research, and practice of interviewing. Emphasis on developing skills for interviewing individuals. Prerequisite(s): PSCH 210 or PSCH 231 or PSCH 312; and a grade of C or better in PSCH 242.

PSCH 423 – Characteristics of Early Adolescence
3 hours. Physiological, social, emotional and cognitive development of early adolescence. The relationship between these developmental characteristics and success in the middle grades. Same as EPSY 446. Prerequisite(s): ED 210 or ED 421 or ED 422 or PSCH 422 or the equivalent, and approval of the College of Education; or admission to the Ph.D. in Psychology program; or consent of the instructor.

+Public Health (PUBH)

PUBH 100 – Health and the Public
3 hours. Students will examine both historical and contemporary public health stories focusing on the United States to begin to understand the contexts, systems, professions, tools, and skills associated with the public health enterprise. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

+Sociology (SOC)

SOC 105 – Social Problems
3 hours. Contemporary social problems examined from the perspectives of social institutions, culture, inequality, organizations and groups, political and economic structure, social change, and social policy. May be substituted for SOC 100 as a prerequisite for other sociology courses. Individual and Society course, and US Society course.

SOC 201 – Introductory Sociological Statistics
4 hours. An introduction to the basic statistical methods used in the analysis of sociological data. 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or SOC 105; and either MATH 090 or MATH 092 or MATH 118 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

SOC 212 – Human Sexuality: Social Perspectives
3 hours. Historical and cultural perspectives on contemporary American sexuality; knowledge, attitudes, and practices; sexuality over the life cycle, socialization; affection, interpersonal attraction; marriage, law, other institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 224 – Gender and Society
3 hours. Sociological perspectives on gender as a factor in social stratification; gender role acquisition; individual and social consequences of changing social definitions of gender roles. Same as GWS 224. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or GWS 101 or GWS 102. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

SOC 225 – Racial and Ethnic Groups
3 hours. Sociological and social-psychological analysis of racial, religious, and other ethnic groups; consideration of historical and current social problems arising from their relationships in society. Same as AAST 225 and LALS 225. Prerequisite: SOC 100; or consent of the instructor. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

SOC 231 – Criminology
3 hours. Introductory survey of the literature developed by criminologists in their study of crime in American society. Same as CLJ 220. Prerequisite: CLJ 101.

+Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 102 – Elementary Spanish II
4 hours. Continuation of SPAN 101. Credit is not given for SPAN 102 if the student has credit for SPAN 110. For students who have never studied Spanish. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access are required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or the equivalent. Blended – Online & Classroom. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

SPAN 103 – Elementary Spanish III
4 hours. Continuation of SPAN 102 and SPAN 110. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: SPAN 102 or SPAN 110 and placement by the department. Blended – Online & Classroom. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

SPAN 104 – Topics in Spanish Language and Culture
4 hours. Can be used to complete the fourth semester requirement in Spanish. Students work with short literary and cultural readings in Spanish and review some specific grammatical concepts. See departmental website for placement information. Use of a computer and internet access are required. This course requires students to complete approximately eight hours of online materials per week. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisites: SPAN 103 and appropriate score on the department placement test or placement by department. Blended – Online & Classroom. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

SPAN 202 – Spanish Grammar in Practice
3 hours. Reviews basic concepts in Spanish grammar, including verb conjugations, tense, mood, aspect, prepositions, and pronouns. Previously listed as SPAN 305. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 104 or Grade of C or better in SPAN 114; or appropriate score on the department placement test. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

+Special Education (SPED)

All SPED courses listed below begin 6/13/16 and end 7/22/16.

SPED 448   Topics in Special Education: Project SET
1 – 4 hours. Course or workshop on pre-announced topic on the education of handicapped children, adolescents, or adults. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): SPED 410 and consent of the instructor.

SPED 467  Social and Emotional Development and Disabilities
3 hours. Exploration of the risk factors and different theoretical approaches associated with the social and emotional development of youth ages 5-21 with and without disabilities. Same as SPED 467. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): SPED 461 or ED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

SPED 482 – Collaborating with Families, Community, and Professionals
3 hours. Explores the dynamics of professional collaboration with families, addressing characteristics, structures, and processes of collaboration for children and youth with and without disabilities. Same as EPSY 482. Previously listed as SPED 582. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): SPED 461, applicable to SPED M.Ed. students only; or consent of the instructor.

SPED 514 – Principles of ABA and Experimental Analysis of Behavior
3 hours. Development of knowledge and skills to conduct behavioral assessments in school, home, and clinical settings, and to create behavior plans for school and community inclusion. Prerequisite(s): SPED 513 and Admission to the LBSII Program or admission as a doctorate student or consent of the instructor. — course will be offered online Δ online

SPED 515 – Transition Planning and Vocational Programming for Students with Disabilities, Part 1
3 hours. Development of knowledge and skills to provide individuals with disabilities-specific skills to enhance successful transitions especially for adolescents and young adults with disabilities. Field work required. Prerequisites: SPED 513 and Admission to the LBSII program or admission as a doctorate student or consent of the instructor.

SPED 522 – Advanced Procedures in Special Educator as Consultant
3 hours. Development of knowledge and skills to collaborate and show leadership in educational settings through use of consultation models and current school-wide support models. Field work required. Prerequisites: SPED 410 and Admission to the LBSII Program or admission as a doctorate student or consent of the instructor.

SPED 573 – Understanding Research in Special Education
3 hours. Overview of research methodology appropriate for teachers of special populations with emphasis on developing skills in critically reading research reports. Prerequisite: ED 461 or SPED 461 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor.

SPED 576 – Internship in Assessment
3 hours. Internship experiences in an assessment clinic for special education majors. Field work required. Prerequisite: SPED 462 or the equivalent or consent of the instructor

SPED 578  Classroom-Based Inquiry Internship
3 hours. Field-based internship experiences in special education classrooms. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the program faculty.

+Statistics (STAT)

STAT 101 – Introduction to Statistics
4 hours. Applications of statistics in the real world, displaying and describing data, normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Credit is not given for STAT 101 for majors in Mathematics and Computer Science, Mathematics, and Teaching of Mathematics. Credit is not given for STAT 101 if the student has credit for STAT 130. Extensive computer use required. This course is offered in both a blended and traditional format. If the section is marked “Blended-Online and Classroom,” use of a computer and internet access is required. Blended sections require students to do some of their coursework online. A high-speed connection, while not required, is strongly suggested. Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in MATH 090, or appropriate score on the Department placement test, or consent of the instructor. Important placement testing information for visiting students.

STAT 381 – Applied Statistical Methods I
3 hours. Graphical and tabular representation of data; Introduction to probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses. Includes SAS and SPSSX applications. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

STAT 401 – Introduction to Probability
3 OR 4 hours. Probability spaces, random variables and their distributions, conditional distribution and stochastic independence, special distributions, sampling distributions, limit theorems. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 210.

+Theatre (THTR)

THTR 161 – Introduction to Acting I
3 hours. Basic vocal and physical stage performance techniques including the role of character in relation to the intellectual and emotional landscape of a play.

+Urban Planning and Policy (UPP)

UPP 461 – Introduction to GIS for Planning
4 hours. Applications of Geographic Information Systems to urban planning and policy making. Course Information: Same as GEOG 469. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor. Priority registration will be given to students admitted to a campus certificate program in Geospatial Analysis and Visualization, graduate students in Urban Planning and Policy, or students in the Master of Arts in Real Estate program.

UPP 465 – Special Topics in GSAV: Web GIS
2 hours. Intensive exploration of specialized topics in Geospatial Analysis and Visualization. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. 2 to 5 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours for undergraduate students and 12 hours for graduate students. Students may register in more than one section per term. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in UPP 460; or Grade of B or better in UPP 461; and appropriate score on the department placement test; and senior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

UPP 500 – History and Theory of Urban Planning
4 hours. Course surveys the history and theory of the planning profession and introduces major currents of thought and innovation that have guided and continue to shape theoretical and practical planning problems. Prerequisite: Admission to the Urban Planning and Policy program or consent of the instructor.

UPP 501 – Urban Space, Place and Institutions
4 hours. Students will learn to use a variety of social science disciplines to explain and interpret the form and function of urban space, including urbanization, suburbanization, regionalism, globalization, and sustainability. Prerequisites: Admission to a degree program in Urban Planning and Policy or the Master of Arts in Real Estate; or consent of the instructor.

UPP 590 – Professional Practice Experience
4 hours. 300 hours of practical planning experience through an internship placement approved by the Urban Planning and Policy Program. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Field work required. Prerequisites: Approval of the Department and completion of 12 hours of credit towards the Master of Urban Planning and Policy degree.

+Urban Studies (US)

US 202 – Planning Great Cities
3 hours. What makes a city great, how cities change, can cities be planned, and how planners plan; characteristics of Great Cities and current urban planning issues. Previously listed as UPP 202.